the girl with no door on her mouth

"'Visceral' is a word that comes to mind when the subject is Fides Krucker. So is "sensual." Reviewers of Krucker's singing performances have often noted her range of primal sounds and bizarre utterances, forms of expression that seem to have their source in parts of the body way beyond the voice box."

"The acclaimed mezzo-soprano is one of Canada's foremost divas of contemporary music, revered for her gutsy experimentation, both vocally and emotionally."

Paula Citron, The Globe and Mail

"Vivid Vocalizing"
Now Magazine



...a potent evening of interdisciplinary electroacoustic musical pieces, starring contemporary vocalist Fides Krucker and featuring the music of Gavin Bryars, Rainer Weins and a world premiere from Wende Bartley with libretto by Anne Carson.

Drawing on her "disturbing eloquence of voice and movement" (Toronto Star), the "magnificently gifted" (Vancouver Province) Krucker embarks on a visceral voyage through loss, destitution, transformation and beauty. Krucker will exercise her remarkable stage presence and vocal range to weave three differing pieces into one visceral theatrical voyage, taking the audience on an emotional journey that highlights the profound relationship between a human being's existence and the environment. The intimate setting of Passe Muraille's Backspace will also be transformed into a work of art through three-dimensional sculpture, light and sound. nocturnal marine phosphorescence, evoking both beauty and fragility.



Fides Krucker


The Mercy Suite exists in a tight, almost airless space of loneliness and alienation. Rainer Weins' de-tuned, spare and ethereal guitar parts paint a landscape that is fragile, mystical and dangerous. The horrible truth of Mercy's life comes to light through musical snapshots burdened by an internal homelessness that is part of the human heart. This monodrama on destitution is a reworking of sections of the character Mercy from Weins' opera Down Here On Earth (a role performed by Krucker for Autumn Leaf Performance).

"The girl with no door on her mouth", a world premiere, is a collage of the award-winning Anne Carson's most visceral poetry and Wende Bartley's richly layered electroacoustic magic that mines the intimate feminine soul. It begins with Emily Dickinson escaping the weight of the patriarchy and then enters worlds where female characters explore the tension between mind and body while the performing space is saturated with the sensual.


The White Lodge is a sumptuous electroacoustic piece for voice and audiotape using a passage from Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. Gavin Bryars music takes the audience deep into the resonances of the ocean while Krucker assumes the perspective of the novel's Captain Nemo describing the haunting miracle of nocturnal marine phosphorescence, evoking both beauty and fragility. The Mercy Suite exists in a tight, almost airless space of loneliness and alienation. Rainer Weins' de-tuned, spare and ethereal guitar parts paint a landscape that is fragile, mystical and dangerous. The horrible truth of Mercy's life comes to light through musical snapshots burdened by an internal homelessness that is part of the human heart. This monodrama on destitution is a reworking of sections of the character Mercy from Weins' opera Down Here On Earth (a role performed by Krucker for Autumn Leaf Performance).





"Krucker, who fashioned the libretto from various Carson writings, first came across the poet/essayist through her article The Gender of Sound. Carson is director of graduate studies in McGill's classics department and her specialty area is Ancient Greece. The article describes how the voices of women of that time were controlled by the patriarchal society and how scholars have coined the phrase "sumptuous destitution" to describe female silence. Explains Krucker: "The Ancient Greek physicians believed that the openings of both a woman's vagina and her mouth were connected. For example, a voice could telegraph the fact that a woman was menstruating, or that she had lost her virginity, and because of this vocal and sexual relationship, strict controls were put on women about when they could use their voices in society."
Bartley and Krucker were particularly fascinated by the ololyga, a piercing female outcry that represents either intense pleasure or intense pain, and which had its roots in the Goddess worship that preceded the Greek patriarchy. "Women were forbidden to perform the ololyga within city walls," explains Krucker. "This special sound was only permitted at regulated female rituals outside the city gates.
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Paula Citron - Gloe & Mail